Great resource for anyone writing a story set in the early 20th century or in a survival-type situation.

girldwarf:

lesbipocalypse:

totalhipsterdickbag:

Someone can say that they don’t really enjoy YA. They don’t enjoy that character age. But… (x)

This is crap. There are things you can relate to as a teenager but not as an adult. There are things you can look at and think “yes when I was a teenager, that would really have appealed to me, but it really doesn’t anymore, because those are teen problems/issues which are no longer my issues” and saying you’ve “matured past” is correct.

Maybe try not being so sensitive about how other people experience literature and their relation to it.

if you’re still into that when you’re no longer a “young adult” then whatever, but don’t dictate to other people how they can relate to literature because it hurts your feelings.

I agree with her to a point, people ask why I’m so into “kids” books (read: Harry Potter, Lord of the Rings, the Hobbit etc) and act like I’m in some way immature

This is not crap, totalhipsterdickbag. This is GOLD. She’s completely right. The notion that “there are things you can relate to as a teenager but not as an adult” is variant for every person, and it’s ludicrous to think there are limitations on when or how we relate to books. Young Adult books are not limited to “Teen Problems,” and “Teen Problems” are human problems that provide meaningful insights to many people. You should try reading Act Your Age!: A Cultural Construction of Adolescence by Nancy Lesko; it’s extremely informative and completely debunks almost everything you said, particularly in relation to your totally useless examination of age.

People don’t automatically “mature past” an entire varied, complex genre of literature. Some people will feel as though they’ve grown out of something, but that’s not a requirement of anyone’s relationship with YA lit. She is right to be mad, and she is right to express her feelings. You mock her for speaking up, but what she says is actually contemporary in fields of publishing, writing, and literature. She’s so beyond you it’s humiliating.

What’s interesting about your comment that she shouldn’t be “so sensitive” to how others “experience literature” is that you are literally being too sensitive to how others experience literature. YOU are, ironically, the one who is attempting to dictate when literature is “appropriate” for a reader and attempting to describe the validity of the content for different age groups. You overgeneralize entire genres comprised of millions of books with your wrong assumptions. And you are not an authority on what is and is not valid literature. Accept that your opinion is ill-informed and reactionary.

Walk into any literature department at a university or any writer’s group, and you will be shut down so fast your neck will snap. You are so obviously and completely not a part of literature/writing discourse that it’s embarrassing to even read what you commented. You’re just plain wrong, lmao.

(Source: fictionalboy)

kitzykid:

peechingtonmariejust:

fastcompany:

The publishing industry’s packaging of women’s literary fiction in stereotypically girly covers makes great books seem trashy.
“Even when their artistic merits are equal, women writers often still lack the cultural authority of their male counterparts, and this rampant trashy branding contributes to that disparity.”
Read More>

but i’m trying to wrap my mind around how the original author connects feminine with trashy. How are any of these covers “trashy”? Because they are feminine? Because they are women? That’s trashy?
Mmmk.

I mean, I get the point that the way these covers are presented makes them look like the kind of novels by women that are generally scoffed at, buuuut the conversation I want to have is about why we are scoffing at novels geared towards women.
Does a book that looks “girly” inherently have less value? Why is reading a novel that looks feminine (“trashy”) less acceptable than reading an action or mystery novel that is likely written in similar language/style, or at a similar level?

YES! This whole thing bothers me a lot and I think that’s why. To me this is more an issue of misrepresentation. Why are publishers re-packaging really dramatic, heavy-issue novels to look like romantic humor?Except I feel like what this article is saying is that novels shouldn’t feature women on the cover if they want to be taken seriously, and I call serious bullshit on that. I definitely don’t think that’s the message we need to be sending. And I also don’t like the choice of “tarted-up.” So it’s not okay for a woman to wear a dress, put on lipstick, wear a bathing suit, or show her back? That makes her a “tart” now?Eek.

kitzykid:

peechingtonmariejust:

fastcompany:

The publishing industry’s packaging of women’s literary fiction in stereotypically girly covers makes great books seem trashy.

Even when their artistic merits are equal, women writers often still lack the cultural authority of their male counterparts, and this rampant trashy branding contributes to that disparity.”

Read More>

but i’m trying to wrap my mind around how the original author connects feminine with trashy. How are any of these covers “trashy”? Because they are feminine? Because they are women? That’s trashy?

Mmmk.

I mean, I get the point that the way these covers are presented makes them look like the kind of novels by women that are generally scoffed at, buuuut the conversation I want to have is about why we are scoffing at novels geared towards women.

Does a book that looks “girly” inherently have less value? Why is reading a novel that looks feminine (“trashy”) less acceptable than reading an action or mystery novel that is likely written in similar language/style, or at a similar level?


YES! This whole thing bothers me a lot and I think that’s why. To me this is more an issue of misrepresentation. Why are publishers re-packaging really dramatic, heavy-issue novels to look like romantic humor?

Except I feel like what this article is saying is that novels shouldn’t feature women on the cover if they want to be taken seriously, and I call serious bullshit on that. I definitely don’t think that’s the message we need to be sending. And I also don’t like the choice of “tarted-up.” So it’s not okay for a woman to wear a dress, put on lipstick, wear a bathing suit, or show her back? That makes her a “tart” now?

Eek.

argonianbot:

i dont think you guys appreciate how rad this site is 

because first of all you got your basic fantasy and game race names for like

everything

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BUT AS IF THAT ISN’T ENOUGH

REAL NAMES WHICH ARE GOOD FOR BOOKS

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AND THIS THERE’S MORE????

BAM, PLACE NAMES

image

AND STILL MORE

image

image

SO YOU SEE THESE LITTLE OPTIONS HERE

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PLEASE, PLEASE

GO AND TRY TO HELP A GOOD PERSON OUT

(Source: starscrmeme)

darlavillani:

Nine Literary Magazines for New and Unpublished Writers
"Seeing your work in print for the first time is a unique thrill. But it can feel like a daunting task to submit your writing to a magazine or journal when you nobody other than friends and family has ever read it. To make the process somewhat less scary, here are 9 literary magazines that welcome submissions from new and never before published writers."
 Read on.
Let’s stay connected.

darlavillani:

Nine Literary Magazines for New and Unpublished Writers

"Seeing your work in print for the first time is a unique thrill. But it can feel like a daunting task to submit your writing to a magazine or journal when you nobody other than friends and family has ever read it. To make the process somewhat less scary, here are 9 literary magazines that welcome submissions from new and never before published writers."

 Read on.

Let’s stay connected.

Writing Tips #85: Nine Kick-Ass Excercises to Find Your Character’s Voice

bookgeekconfessions:

Tips by  Alicia Rasley

Originally posted on aliciarasley.com

image

Creating unique voices for each viewpoint character is essential in creating fiction readers want to read over and over. Unique voices stick with you and generate the best reviews.

Here are 9 exercises to help you discover your viewpoint character(s) voice.  Select the ones that appeal most.  Get into the mind of your character.  Free-write the answer to each question in first-person, as if YOU are the character.

First-person, remember.  That will help you get a sense of the character’s voice.

EXERCISE #1: Learning Style

1. How do you learn best?  Observation?  Participation?  Trial and error? Rumination and cogitation?  Consulting experts?  Writing?

Example to get you started – historical character named Rebecca: “Oh, I think I learn best by observation.  I’m an artist– well, I sketch a little, or a lot, I suppose– and so I’m always looking at people and places and things and trying to capture them with my pencil.

I like to imagine what people are like from the way they move and the expressions on their faces.  I try not to make judgments until I’ve studied the people, however.  So I guess I’m an observer. I’m certainly not really a participant.  Of course, I have to participate in all sorts of activities, but given my druthers, I’d sit on the sidelines and watch first, until I felt more confident.

Oh, dear, I sound like such a tentative creature.  I guess I am that, after all– except for the once, when I eloped with Tommy.  Now that time, I didn’t stop to study and observe.  I threw myself right into that situation!  And I guess I’ve never regretted it, not even when he died and left me alone.

Maybe it’s time again for me to stop studying and just jump in?

EXERCISE #2: Openness

  • How open are you to new ideas and information?
  • you change your mind frequently, based on what people have told you?
  • Are you a traditionalist, deciding on the basis of “what’s always been”?
  • If someone is arguing with you, are you more likely to change your mind or dig in your heels?
  • What if the arguer is right?

Read More

dudeinpublishing:

I’m not the most voracious or wide-ranging reader I know, but I’m fucking tired of reading the below phrases:

-“Low-slung” to describe anything (seriously, I see this WAY too much in otherwise fantastic sentences)

-“Wan expression” or “wanly” or really any use of “wan”…


I think the problem with any of these words or expressions comes not from using them at all, but actually from misusing them. “Ragged” for example could be an appropriate word to describe the rough, irregular breathing of someone in the throes of a difficult death, but it isn’t the right word to describe someone who is out of breath. For that matter, can we discuss “panting?” That’s the one that drives me insane. Please don’t turn your characters into dogs. Please. (Unless they are dogs, of course…)

characterdesigninspiration:

Quite a few people requested some form of trait/personality generator, and here’s the result!  I wanted to keep it vague enough that the options could work for any universe, be it modern, fantasy, scifi, or anything else, so these are really just the basics. Remember that a character is much more than a list of traits, and this should only be used as a starting point– I tried to include a variety of things, but further development is definitely a must.

Could pair well with the gender and sexuality generator.

To Play: Click and drag each gif, or if that isn’t working/you’re on mobile, just take a screenshot of the whole thing (multiple screenshots may be required if you want more than one trait from each category).